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Slayer With Ice T And The Exploited Give The Finger To The System

“Lost Tracks” focuses on the early Punk, Punk Rock and Thrash Metal acts who all built on a raw and aggressive, no holds barred attitude that gave birth to Slayer
July 5, 2018
By subcomtom

 

“Our government is fucked

Sure to bring us down

The media incites civil unrest

Hatred can bring you down”

 

Sound familiar? Well, it might surprise you to learn that these lines were not written in 2018, but represent the opening verse of Disorder, a medley of three songs from The Exploited, recorded by Slayer featuring Ice T in 1992, and then released on the Judgement Night film Soundtrack in 1993.

At first glance, this looks like a very strange crew of artists and musical genres, but it all makes perfect sense when you take a closer look at their interrelations, and listen to the raw power of this unique musical collage.

 

 

 

 

The Exploited are a Scottish Punk band. Together with bands such as Charged GBH and Discharge, they were considered to be the protagonists of the UK82 Punk movement.

The Term UK82 came from one of the songs of The Exploited, which together with two other Exploited songs, namely War and Disorder, were mashed up by Ice T with Slayer in our “Lost Tracks” feature this week.

The work of The Exploited was highly influential on future Punk, Punk Rock and Thrash Metal acts who all built on the raw and aggressive, don’t give a fuck attitude in both their compositions and lyrics.

 

Ice T, who was already touring with his own controversial Metal project Body Count (check out Body Count’s song Cop Killer and its impact on the America of the early Nineties to see what I mean by controversial), was their perfect partner in crime for Slayer in this collaboration.

Ice T with Kerry King of Slayer

 

 

One of these Thrash Metal bands was Slayer, who like no other of the early Thrash pioneers, showcased an unseen mixture of provocation, speed, and brutality that shook the foundations of heavy music like a war tank going through a dollhouse introducing kerosene-based liquor to the 5 o’clock tea party.

Read more “Lost Tracks” – Taking the Law into Your Own Hands

Slayer’s love for Punk and Hardcore is testified to on their 7th Studio album “Undisputed Attitude,” which was released in 1996 and showcased Slayer cover versions of Punk and Hardcore songs plus some early Punk compositions of their main axeman Jeff Hanneman.

In the late Eighties/early Nineties, Hip-Hop and Metal were much closer than today, as the two genres were still operating in the shadows of the underground, rather than the spotlight of the mainstream music business.

One of the early links was producer Rick Rubin, who founded his Def Jam Records label and signed hip-hop artists like LL Cool J, Public Enemy (listen to their collaboration with Anthrax on Bring the Noise as another early example of a superb Hip Hop/Metal collaboration), and the Beastie Boys.

 

Interesting fact: Slayer’s Kerry King was playing guitar on the Beastie Boys 1987 hit single “No Sleep to Brooklyn”.

 

Apart from these soon to be Hip-Hop superstars, Rick Rubin also signed Slayer in a bold move for Def Jam, and with Reign in Blood, produced the ultimate and most influential extreme Metal album of all time.

When the producers of the 1993 movie Judgement Night had the idea to pair Rock and Hip-Hop artists for the Soundtrack of the film (a mediocre movie which in my opinion is not worth watching), Rick Rubin and Slayer came into play.

 

 

The film Judgment Night (1993) starring Emilio Estevez, Cuba Gooding Jr., Stephen Dorff, and Jeremy Piven

The film Judgment Night (1993) starring Emilio Estevez, Cuba Gooding Jr., Stephen Dorff, and Jeremy Piven (not pictured)

 

 

Ice T, who was already touring with his controversial Metal project Body Count (check out Body Count’s song Cop Killer and its impact on America of the early Nineties to see what I mean by contentious), was their perfect partner in crime for Slayer in this collaboration.

Watch this interview and hear Ice T and Slayer talk about how their collaboration on Disorder came together and how it worked out for them.

 

 

 

 

Disorder is one of the best medleys in music history; blending three outstanding punk classics from The Exploited, and adding some updated lyrics referring to the 1992 Los Angeles riots. The violence was triggered by a video showing LAPD officers beating a defenseless Rodney King. Disorder was performed by two notorious California acts in a most brutal but still very groovy way.

Read more “Lost Tracks” – Old Men’s Desire for War

Disorder does not fit into the whole concept of the Judgement Night Soundtrack. The song does not show any Hip-Hop influences, with Ice T stomping away in the footprints of Black Flag, and his own group Body Count rather than rapping as expected.

The lack of Hip-Hop influences does not diminish the greatness of the whole soundtrack album. The music is a sharp contrast to the quality of the film and developed into a classic example of the early Nineties alternative music scene featuring artists such as Faith No More, Pearl Jam, Helmet, Biohazard, Run DMC, Cypress Hill, and Living Colour to name just a few.

It’s a tragedy that 25 years after Disorder was released, topics like police brutality and racial inequality are still running the agenda, fueled by a system which looks even more evil than 25 years ago.

All signs are pointing towards disorder once again.

 

War!!!

Our government is fucked
Sure to bring us down
The media incites civil unrest
Hatred can bring you down

War!!!

I don’t want your war
War!!!
We don’t need your war
We don’t need your war

War!!!

Military beasts starvin’ countries
Drama brings you to your knees
Spill your blood to save humanity
Dyin’ for the food we feed

War!!!

I don’t want your war
War!!!
We don’t need your war
We don’t need your war

War!!!

Our government is fucked
Sure to bring us down
The media incites civil unrest
Hatred can bring you down

Injustice drives you crazy
It drives l.a. insane
In this generation
Hatred is the name

War!!!

L.A. ’92

Bastard magic should make you cry
The answer to the question is we ain’t gonna die

L.A. ’92

Police can make me under stress
While all L.A.’s a fuckin’ mess
Don’t patronize my fuckin’ ass
Some heads will get crashed

L.A. ’92

Billy’s got himself a gun
He’s goin’ to fuckin’ war
He won’t revert to sticks and stones
Just bullet holes and broken bones
Chaos, chaos, chaos, chaos
Don’t give a fuck!

Covert body knock ya down
No weight support so taken down
The juk-jock, a lock in a cell
We ain’t got shit, now had enough
Chaos, chaos, chaos, chaos
Don’t give a fuck!

Disorder!!!

 

 

Do you like what you’re reading? See the other “Lost Tracks” articles from the archive below. Be sure to check back next Thursday when RTN delves into another Lost Track.

 

© 2018 rockingthenet.com

RTN’s “Lost Tracks” is a weekly feature of Rock’s hidden gems and little-known bands.

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The Lost Tracks Archive

Great King Rat: A Unknown Queen Piece Of Powerful Heavy Royal Rock

The Who: A Creepy Crawly Horror Show Starring Boris The Spider

On The Hunt With New Model Army And Sepultura

David Bowie’s Newly Shoed Dark Horse Lives In A Criminal World

Ween: Two Longtime Friends And A DAT Machine = Eclectic Music

Beasts Of Bourbon Redefined Guitar-Based Rock’N’Roll

Wet Pussycat And The Unreleased Riff That Describes Stoner Rock

Stepping Stone Finds Its Way Through More Than 50 Years

An Obscure Rolling Stones Song Mick Jagger Wrote In Prison

Hank Williams III: Generation Spanning Sadness, Depression, and Solitude

Lucifer’s Friend Makes Their Mark In “Lost Tracks” With Ride The Sky

Woods Of Ypres Takes Us On A Spiritual Journey In “Lost Tracks”

Old Men’s Desire For War, Seen By Mudhoney, The Founders Of Grunge

Budgie: An Early Influencer Of The Heavy Metal Bands To Come

Aphrodite’s Child: Two Unexpected Greek Titans Of Progressive Rock